Read It: Chinese Cinderella

Chinese Cinderella: The True Story of an Unwanted Daughter

Chinese Cinderella: The True Story of an Unwanted Daughter by Adeline Yen Mah

Chinese Cinderella is a biography based on the childhood of the author Adeline Yen Mah. Adeline, the 5th child born in an affluent family during the 1940’s in China, was considered bad luck by her family because of the death of her mother when she was born. Her father had remarried but things just went from bad to worse as their stepmother clearly cut them from the comforts of what was supposed to be an easy childhood. Adeline became more of an outcast in her own family when she caught the ire of her stepmother. She was considered invisible by her father  and bullied by her siblings. She sought comfort from her aunt and occasionally from her grandfather.

The story revolves on her struggles as she seeks acceptance and love from her own family. Whatever lacked in her home, she found it in school. She felt loved, accepted and respected in school.  She studied hard and always got good grades. This caught her father’s attention and he commended her for it. This little attention gave her the boost she needed. She worked hard to be the best in school because this is the only way her father recognized her. And truly, hard work really pays off well. After writing a literary piece and winning the grand prize, everything changed. She finally became a pride of her father and was able to convince him to let her continue studying.

To sum it up, the story is a simple narration of what had transpired during the childhood of Adeline. Everything seemed very basic and there are points in which you may have thought that you have heard or read or watched something with a setting almost the same as this. It is not entirely new to readers but it still gives a heartwarming inspiration nonetheless.

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About Elaine

interior designer | occasional bookworm | closet otaku | music lover | frustrated craftsman | lazy artist | part time bum
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